?

Log in

No account? Create an account

And then there were three

Hi guys!

I thought you all might find this amusing. To add to the confusion that is growing up in an Catholic/Jewish household, I officially declared my major yesterday: Islamic Studies.

And now...I am officially confused. =)

The big question

My parents are wonderful--don't get me wrong. But I asked to be sent to church and/or Hebrew school and they didn't want that.

I'm in college now, attending a Jewish university. I picked it for academics, not religion, but I thought Mom and Dad were going to flip (quietly, like they do, but still). But they actually seem relieved, like my religious education is no longer their responsibility.

I'm embarrassed to be the only kid in temple who doesn't speak Hebrew and doesn't know what's going on. I'm not kidding--I feel like the quintessential half-and-half. One foot in, one foot out.

How do you stay true to your heritage and still fit into both communities?

Discussion Topic: Parents & Religious Ed

Hi guys! There hasn't been much action around here, so I thought I'd post a discussion topic. Please don't have flashbacks to high school English. *wince*

Is it right to refuse to educate your child in one and/or both of your religions? I spotted at least one mom here--thoughts? Should parents choose one religion or just educate informally about both?

Newbie

Name: Ami
Age: 26
Interests: The fine arts, metal music, classical literature, B-movies, and politics
Religious background: My mom is Presbyterian, my father is Muslim. Being Japanese American, I also was exposed to a good deal of Buddhism and went to the temple regularly as well.
Your beliefs: I am baptized Presbyterian, and serve as an elder. However, I have always practiced certain aspects of both Christianity and Islam. It actually did not cause much confusion growing up. I went to church every Sunday, but celebrated Islamic holy days in my house. I think that the single most frustrating aspect of having grown up in both faiths is reading the constant stereotypes perpetuated by the media about Islam, mostly by Western religions. Having been raised with both faiths in one household, I have always believed that the two are very close in their beliefs and practices, but the rest of the world tends to think not.

I'm glad that I found this community. I'm looking forward to some thought provoking conversations.

Introduction

Hi everyone, I lurk every once and a while, but I wanted to introduce myself formally.
So I will use the little "format" as well as throwing in some of my own stuff.

Name: My name is Danielle
Age: I am 22 years old, but I will be 23 on June 25th
Interests:  I run a local Mother-to-mother support group called ICAN of Connecticut, I enjoy photography, tattoos, my son, and animals.
Religious background:  I personally am Mormon, my husband is Roman Catholic, my parents are Prodistant (SP?) and Roman Catholic, and my son is not anything yet.
Your beliefs:  I mostly live my life by the LDS standards, with a few exceptions on social issues which I hold strong opinions on.
I am hoping to find some others who live in mixed faith house holds and I am also interested in seeing how through parenting you address religion with a spouse of a different faith.

Mod Intro

Name: Katie

Age: student, and we'll leave it there

Interests: marching band, running, writing, neuroscience, music

Religious background: My mom's family is Russian-Jewish, and my dad's family is Irish/Italian Catholic. Both of my parents attended religious schools as kids and as a result now claim to be agnostic (although my dad is still a Catholic boy at heart). Since most of my dad's family has passed away, I was more or less raised Jewish from a theoloical standpoint, and although we celebrate Chanukah, Christmas, Passover, and Rosh Hashanah, my parents discouraged me from ever attending Hebrew school or temple. We don't have one nearby anyway; I grew up in a predominantly white Polish/Italian/Irish Catholic town.

Your beliefs: are very confused right now! Lol. I make an attempt to be an observant Jew because tradition is important to me, but I'm struggling to find God at the moment.